ISSN : 2266-6060

Dividing Line

dividing line

Minneapolis-Saint Paul Airport, june 2014.

Flying is a strange experience from a temporal and spatial point of view: it is the fastest way to get from one point to another and yet it is one with the most waiting times. In addition, multiple passport, baggage, boarding pass checks, body scan delay the rapid movement promised by aircraft and constrain future passengers to follow predefined paths, being constantly separatend and amalgamated. To meet the expectations and between those obligatory passage points, airports have turned into shopping and entertainment space , spider webs in which almost motionless travelers are taken.
To set the internal circulations of a cosmopolitan crowd, panels, signs, symbols abound as transport devices: trolleys, escalators and elevators in all kinds succeed as in a Tati movie. And it is on one of them that one is suddenly faced with a dividing line. To the left, you should walk, on the right just stands, the walkway itself tells us, from one end to the other. A moving line that seems motionless, a slogan repeated in an infinite loop, and travelers again divided into coherent flows, as they pass by the 200 yards of this corridor.